Repentance

Repentance means forsaking sin and turning the heart and will to God.

(Bible Dictionary, “Repentance,” 760)

True repentance is based on faith in the Lord Jesus Christ.

(Ezra Taft Benson, “A Mighty Change of Heart,” Ensign, Oct. 1989, 2)

If we do not repent, we must suffer the punishments spoken of by the Lord.

(D&C 19:17-20)

Repentance includes making proper restitution to the limit of one’s power.

(Teachings of Presidents of the Church: Harold B. Lee, 29–30)

Chalkboard Activity NEW

Chalkboard Example #1

Introduce the Doctrine:  Before class begins, make a list of words on the chalkboard beginning with the letters “Re” that relate to the word “Repentance” (without telling students).  Ask class members to search the words, like those on Chalkboard Example #1, and discover what Church doctrine pertains to all. You can give them the hint, it also starts with an “Re.”  After a moment to think, have them share the word, then have several students give specific examples on how the words relate.  Erase the words and write the question shown on Chalkboard Example #2.

Chalkboard Activity 2

Chalkboard Example #2

Prayerfully study the suggested scriptures and resources in this month’s Come Follow Me outline, How can repentance help me everyday?.  Help the youth better understand the importance of repentance in their lives as you give them opportunities to study selected quotes taken from Elder D. Todd Christofferson’s talk “The Divine Gift of Repentance” and Elder Neil L. Andersen’s talk “Repent … That I May Heal You.”

Print off and pass the quote cards to members of your class.  Have them read through the message and answer the question at the bottom of the card given them.  Invite them to turn to their neighbor and share their findings, then ask class members to share as a group.

Sacrifice Sooner Triump Suffered I am He Procrastinate Progress Repentance Godly Sorrow Elements Daily Change Celebration Activities

“One of my favorite scriptural accounts that illustrates this important principle is found in Matthew chapter 14. As the disciples watched the Savior walk on the Sea of Galilee toward their boat, they thought they were seeing a ghost. Jesus assured them that it was He and that they need not be afraid. Peter declared, “Lord, if it be thou, bid me come unto thee on the water” (verse 28). Jesus said, “Come.” Matthew then records, “And when Peter was come down out of the ship, he walked on the water, to go to Jesus” (see Matthew 14:24–29).

The rest of the story is what I find most significant. I can’t relate to walking on water, but I can relate to what Peter experienced next:

“But when he saw the wind boisterous, he was afraid; and beginning to sink, he cried, saying, Lord, save me.

“And immediately Jesus stretched forth his hand, and caught him, and said unto him, O thou of little faith, wherefore didst thou doubt?

“And when they were come into the ship, the wind ceased.

“Then they that were in the ship came and worshipped him, saying, Of a truth thou art the Son of God” (Matthew 14:30–33).

All of us have had, are having, or will yet have a Peter-like “sinking” experience in some way and will at some time (probably many times) cry out, “Lord, save me.” Even Peter’s strong fisherman arms were not strong enough to save him. He needed the rescuing arms of Christ, and so do we. Can you imagine Peter—choking, his head bobbing beneath the surface of the water—saying as the Savior extends His arms: “No, thank you. I will swim to shore. I sank myself, so I must save myself”? Of course not. How ridiculous! Yet we sometimes do just that.

We may know in our heads that our mortal arms and hands are deficient—in fact, utterly incapable of rescuing or redeeming us—but we sometimes resist, even recoil from, the outstretched arms of the Savior. Sometimes we spiritually drown ourselves because we won’t allow His arms to cradle us.  May I be bold enough to suggest that it is impossible for anyone who really knows God to doubt his willingness to receive us with open arms in a divine embrace if we will but ‘come unto Him.’ …

“I am convinced that none of us can appreciate how deeply it wounds the loving heart of the Savior of the world when he finds that his people do not feel confident in his care or secure in his hands.” (Brent L. Top, “The Loving Arms of Christ”)

Elder Jeffrey R. Holland:

“All of us have had, are having, or will yet have a Peter-like “sinking” experience in some way and will at some time (probably many times) cry out, “Lord, save me.” EvenPeter in the Water Peter’s strong fisherman arms were not strong enough to save him.  He needed the rescuing arms of Christ, and so do we.  Can you imagine Peter-choking, his head bobbing beneath the surface of the water – saying as the Savior extends His arms: “No, thank you. I will swim to shore.  I sank myself, so I must save myself”?  Of course not!  Yet we sometimes do just that.  We may know in our heads that our mortal arms and hands are deficient – in fact, utterly incapable of rescuing or redeeming us – but we sometimes resist, even recoil from, the outstretched arms of the Savior.  Sometimes we spiritually drown ourselves because we won’t allow His arms to cradle us. May I be bold enough to suggest that it is impossible for anyone who really knows God to doubt his willingness to receive us with open arms in a divine embrace if we will but ‘come unto Him.’ …  I am convinced that none of us can appreciate how deeply it wounds the loving heart of the Savior of the world when he finds that his people do not feel confident in his care or secure in his hands.”

I am a witness of his mighty arms offering comfort and security in my life.  My devotion to and testimony of him has been strengthened because of his atoning mercy and constant care for me.  It is my prayer you feel this matchless love in your own life.  Remembering that it is only through true repentance and taking the arms of our Savior that we can be saved.

Behold, [my arms] of mercy [are] extended towards you, and whosoever will come, him will I receive; and blessed are those who come unto me (3 Nephi 9:14).

Print an optional class handout here:

His Arms - Photo Handout

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